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(taken from Health & Wellness)

Can curry fight cancer? Can tea prevent cavities? You bet. No snake oil here. The phenomenal healing powers in the foods, herbs, and spices made by Mother Nature are bona fide. They help prevent disease, heal the body, and perform other natural miracles. Here are 13 of our favorite healing foods and spices, along with advice on a few important supplements.

SPICES AND HERBS:

Spices and herbs add flavor to your food and spice up your health, too. Use them as healthy additions to your cuisine, not as a medicine, unless recommended by your healthcare practitioner.

Cinnamon - this ancient aromatic spice comes from the bark of the cinnamon tree. It's been used for centuries in fragrances and perfumes, as a spice in foods, and for ailments ranging from indigestion to influenza. In a clinical study, cinnamon was found to help improve glucose and lipids in people with type 2 diabetes.

Curcumin - Turmeric, grown in India, China and South Asia, is best known as the bright yellow spice in curry powder and mustard. Curcumin is a compound that has been isolated from turmeric and has many healing properties. It acts as a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent that helps protect cells against cancer and tumor growth. Research also shows that it may help reduce the progression of coronary vascular disease and retinopathy associated with type 2 diabetes. "In Hawaiian medicine, juice from the turmeric root is used as an anti-inflammatory."

Fennel - a member of the parsley family, fennel has long been used to treat dyspeepsia, flatulence (gas), and nausea. Clinical studies have shown that fennel helps reduce colic in babies and painful or difficult menstruation in women. Chew on some fennel seeds or sip some fennel tea to help relieve stomach or menstrual discomforts.

Ginger - this versatile root can be used as a complement to sushi or to spice up a cake. It is a popular remedy used to help reduce nausea, motion sickness, or morning sickness associated with pregnancy. Some studies suggest that ginger's anti-inflammatory properties may help relieve symptoms of arthritis, rheumatism, and musculoskeletal disorders. Add ginger to your diet by eating some crystallized ginger or brewing some ginger tea!

Rosemary - this is a woody shrub with narrow, aromatic leaves often used in cooking. The german government has approved hte herb for treatment of indigestion, to help relieve symptoms of rheumatism, and, when applied externally, for people with circulatory disorders. Pour in some brewed rosemary tea into your bath for an invigorating soak. It's also good for the scalp and hair. Rinsing dark hair will make it shine. Rosemary oil helps to increase circulation in the scap and to stimulate hair follicles. Soaking sore feet in a very warm foot bath with concentrated rosmeary tea helps to relax the muscles, stimulate circulation, and heal strains.

WHOLE FOODS:

To nourish your palate as well asyour body, whole foods offer the perfect synergistic blend of healing phytochemicals and nutrients to keep you healthy.

Berries - Blueberries, cranberries, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries are powerhouses of nutrients and phytochemicals that fight cancer, hearth disease, and infections. Their star players include vitamin C, fiber, ptoassium, and the phytochemicals anthocyanins and ellagic acid. Ellagic acid, a naturally ocuring compound, exhibits anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic activity in humans: It helps prevent cancer and cell mutations that lead to DNA and RNA damage. Anthocyanins, which give berries their rich colors, are potent antioxidants. Scientific studies show that eating cranberries or drinking the juice can help fight urinary tract infections. Strawberries and cranberries may be protective against cancer. Rats and mice fed blueberries are showing great promice for protection against Alzheimer's and age-related declines in brain function (1/2 cup a day).

Fish, flax, walnuts and soy - What do these have in common? Omega-3 fatty acids. Heart-healthy fats act as a systemic anti-inflammatory. Keep blood clots from forming and hearts beating at a regular pace! Also help prevent sudden death from heart attacks. They might also rduce the risk of Alzheimer's, lung disease, and cancer. They also have other health perks: Fish is an excellent source of low-fat protein. Flaxseeds and flaxseed oil - richest plant sourses of omega 3s. Walnuts (and other nuts) effects lower triglycerides and increase HDL cholesterol. Soy - whether as a bean, tofu, or milk ..packed with protein, fiber, and phytosterols and isoflavones that protect your heart and lower bp and cholesterol.

Cruciferous cousins - no surprise that diets high in fruits and veggies may prevent 20% of all cancers. Broccoli, cabbage, kale, brussels sprouts, bok choy, turnips and cauliflower are HIGH on the list of cancer-fighting veggies. Cruciferous veggies are crammed with bioactive compounds indoles and isothiocyanates. Indoles increase the detoxification of estrogen, reducing that hormone's chance of enhancing cancer growth in hormone-sensitive cells. Isothiocyanates protect against lung cancer. They also are protective against colorectal, stomach and breast cancer!

Whole Grains - FEAR OF CARBS - whole grains supply much needed energy to your cells, muscles, and brain and are full of bioactive compounds that are essential for overall good health --look for grains that say WHOLE on the packages! Whole grain means that the grain is in its natural form with all the original nutrients and fiber intact (not enriched). It includes the bran, germ, and endosperm of the kernel and contains vitamins B and E, protein, fiber, folate, selenium, magnesium, and ophytonutrients that help fight disease and keep cells healthy. When a grain is refined ..it's literally stripped of all it's nutrients! Looking for a different grain ..try Quinoa (keen-wa) ...it has been grown in the Andes Mountains in South America for thousands of years. Though technically not a grain, quinoa cooks up as easily as rice or couscous and has a ghigher protein content than any other grain. Use in place of pasta or other grains, hot cereals, or salads.

Tomatoes - Have some olive oil with those please ...Olive Oil increases the absorption of the lycopene. Lycopene is an antioxidant in tomatoes that protects against heart disease, prostate cancer, and age-related macular degeneration and reduces platelet aggregation (blood clots) in people with type 2 diabetes.

Garlic - Raw, cooked, or roasted, there is a good reason for the popularity of this odoriferous treat. (YUMMY) IT's been used to treat asthma, athlete's foot, and infections and to ward off evil spirits! Scientific studies have shown garlic to be antibacterial, antithrombotic, and to lower blood lipids and cholesterol. It's also protective against some cancers and heart disease. Have some parsley afterwards to ward off that garlicky breath!

Chocolate - most that we buy in supermarkets are loaded with calories from added fat and sugar. Good news - there are compounds in chocolate called flavonoids that are hearth healthy. Cocoa powder and dark chocolate helped keep arteries healthy and increase anti-oxidants and HDL cholesterol. Chocolate milk is great after your workout because it has the perfect ratio of carbs to protein for muscle recovery - 4:1. Choose bittersweet or dark for that occasional treat.

Green tea - it's been around for thousands of years. Contains a hefty ammount of polyphenols that heave been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and antiatherosclerotic effects and helps protect your teeth from cavities. It also acts as a stress buster!

 
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Awesome thread, i like everything but the curry stuff,just too spicey for me.As for garlic i need to wash in it to keep evil away,lol

 
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Originally Posted by Naturally (taken from Health & Wellness)
Can curry fight cancer? Can tea prevent cavities? You bet. No snake oil here. The phenomenal healing powers in the foods, herbs, and spices made by Mother Nature are bona fide. They help prevent disease, heal the body, and perform other natural miracles. Here are 13 of our favorite healing foods and spices, along with advice on a few important supplements.

SPICES AND HERBS:

Spices and herbs add flavor to your food and spice up your health, too. Use them as healthy additions to your cuisine, not as a medicine, unless recommended by your healthcare practitioner.

Cinnamon - this ancient aromatic spice comes from the bark of the cinnamon tree. It's been used for centuries in fragrances and perfumes, as a spice in foods, and for ailments ranging from indigestion to influenza. In a clinical study, cinnamon was found to help improve glucose and lipids in people with type 2 diabetes.

Curcumin - Turmeric, grown in India, China and South Asia, is best known as the bright yellow spice in curry powder and mustard. Curcumin is a compound that has been isolated from turmeric and has many healing properties. It acts as a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent that helps protect cells against cancer and tumor growth. Research also shows that it may help reduce the progression of coronary vascular disease and retinopathy associated with type 2 diabetes. "In Hawaiian medicine, juice from the turmeric root is used as an anti-inflammatory."

Fennel - a member of the parsley family, fennel has long been used to treat dyspeepsia, flatulence (gas), and nausea. Clinical studies have shown that fennel helps reduce colic in babies and painful or difficult menstruation in women. Chew on some fennel seeds or sip some fennel tea to help relieve stomach or menstrual discomforts.

Ginger - this versatile root can be used as a complement to sushi or to spice up a cake. It is a popular remedy used to help reduce nausea, motion sickness, or morning sickness associated with pregnancy. Some studies suggest that ginger's anti-inflammatory properties may help relieve symptoms of arthritis, rheumatism, and musculoskeletal disorders. Add ginger to your diet by eating some crystallized ginger or brewing some ginger tea!

Rosemary - this is a woody shrub with narrow, aromatic leaves often used in cooking. The german government has approved hte herb for treatment of indigestion, to help relieve symptoms of rheumatism, and, when applied externally, for people with circulatory disorders. Pour in some brewed rosemary tea into your bath for an invigorating soak. It's also good for the scalp and hair. Rinsing dark hair will make it shine. Rosemary oil helps to increase circulation in the scap and to stimulate hair follicles. Soaking sore feet in a very warm foot bath with concentrated rosmeary tea helps to relax the muscles, stimulate circulation, and heal strains.

WHOLE FOODS:

To nourish your palate as well asyour body, whole foods offer the perfect synergistic blend of healing phytochemicals and nutrients to keep you healthy.

Berries - Blueberries, cranberries, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries are powerhouses of nutrients and phytochemicals that fight cancer, hearth disease, and infections. Their star players include vitamin C, fiber, ptoassium, and the phytochemicals anthocyanins and ellagic acid. Ellagic acid, a naturally ocuring compound, exhibits anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic activity in humans: It helps prevent cancer and cell mutations that lead to DNA and RNA damage. Anthocyanins, which give berries their rich colors, are potent antioxidants. Scientific studies show that eating cranberries or drinking the juice can help fight urinary tract infections. Strawberries and cranberries may be protective against cancer. Rats and mice fed blueberries are showing great promice for protection against Alzheimer's and age-related declines in brain function (1/2 cup a day).

Fish, flax, walnuts and soy - What do these have in common? Omega-3 fatty acids. Heart-healthy fats act as a systemic anti-inflammatory. Keep blood clots from forming and hearts beating at a regular pace! Also help prevent sudden death from heart attacks. They might also rduce the risk of Alzheimer's, lung disease, and cancer. They also have other health perks: Fish is an excellent source of low-fat protein. Flaxseeds and flaxseed oil - richest plant sourses of omega 3s. Walnuts (and other nuts) effects lower triglycerides and increase HDL cholesterol. Soy - whether as a bean, tofu, or milk ..packed with protein, fiber, and phytosterols and isoflavones that protect your heart and lower bp and cholesterol.

Cruciferous cousins - no surprise that diets high in fruits and veggies may prevent 20% of all cancers. Broccoli, cabbage, kale, brussels sprouts, bok choy, turnips and cauliflower are HIGH on the list of cancer-fighting veggies. Cruciferous veggies are crammed with bioactive compounds indoles and isothiocyanates. Indoles increase the detoxification of estrogen, reducing that hormone's chance of enhancing cancer growth in hormone-sensitive cells. Isothiocyanates protect against lung cancer. They also are protective against colorectal, stomach and breast cancer!

Whole Grains - FEAR OF CARBS - whole grains supply much needed energy to your cells, muscles, and brain and are full of bioactive compounds that are essential for overall good health --look for grains that say WHOLE on the packages! Whole grain means that the grain is in its natural form with all the original nutrients and fiber intact (not enriched). It includes the bran, germ, and endosperm of the kernel and contains vitamins B and E, protein, fiber, folate, selenium, magnesium, and ophytonutrients that help fight disease and keep cells healthy. When a grain is refined ..it's literally stripped of all it's nutrients! Looking for a different grain ..try Quinoa (keen-wa) ...it has been grown in the Andes Mountains in South America for thousands of years. Though technically not a grain, quinoa cooks up as easily as rice or couscous and has a ghigher protein content than any other grain. Use in place of pasta or other grains, hot cereals, or salads.

Tomatoes - Have some olive oil with those please ...Olive Oil increases the absorption of the lycopene. Lycopene is an antioxidant in tomatoes that protects against heart disease, prostate cancer, and age-related macular degeneration and reduces platelet aggregation (blood clots) in people with type 2 diabetes.

Garlic - Raw, cooked, or roasted, there is a good reason for the popularity of this odoriferous treat. (YUMMY) IT's been used to treat asthma, athlete's foot, and infections and to ward off evil spirits! Scientific studies have shown garlic to be antibacterial, antithrombotic, and to lower blood lipids and cholesterol. It's also protective against some cancers and heart disease. Have some parsley afterwards to ward off that garlicky breath!

Chocolate - most that we buy in supermarkets are loaded with calories from added fat and sugar. Good news - there are compounds in chocolate called flavonoids that are hearth healthy. Cocoa powder and dark chocolate helped keep arteries healthy and increase anti-oxidants and HDL cholesterol. Chocolate milk is great after your workout because it has the perfect ratio of carbs to protein for muscle recovery - 4:1. Choose bittersweet or dark for that occasional treat.

Green tea - it's been around for thousands of years. Contains a hefty ammount of polyphenols that heave been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and antiatherosclerotic effects and helps protect your teeth from cavities. It also acts as a stress buster!


Kim what do you think of st johns wort?

 
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I am not on any medicine, i dont really like even taking asprin unless my head is going to burst.I do like natural products.

 

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